Press Release

New resarch group: "Cellular Computations and Learning"

28 Apr 2020 at 13:09

Bonn, April 28th, 2020. A new research group will take up its work at caesar, starting on May 1st, 2020. Group leader Dr. Aneta Koseska, who has habilitated in chemical biology and theoretical physics, is moving from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Physiology in Dortmund to Bonn.

The subject of her research are cells which, like computers, have extensive information processing capabilities. Nevertheless, cellular calculation methods are much more alien and complex then a computer. The group "Cellular Computations and Learning" will investigate this cellular information processing.


About research center caesar

caesar is a neuroethology institute located in Bonn that studies how the collective activity of the vast numbers of interconnected neurons in the brain gives rise to the plethora of animal behaviors. Our research spans a large range of scales from the nano-scale imaging of brain circuitry, to large-scale functional imaging of brain circuitry during behavior, to the quantification of natural animal behaviors.


For further information please contact:

Sebastian Scherrer
Public Relations Officer

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